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2 edition of comparison of sea ice model results using three different wind forcing fields found in the catalog.

comparison of sea ice model results using three different wind forcing fields

W. B. Tucker

comparison of sea ice model results using three different wind forcing fields

by W. B. Tucker

  • 102 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by US Army Corps of Engineers, Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory in [Hanover, N.H.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sea ice -- United States -- Mathematical models.,
  • Geostrophic wind.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementWalter B. Tucker III ; prepared for Office of the Chief of Engineers.
    SeriesCRREL report -- 83-17.
    ContributionsUnited States. Army. Corps of Engineers., Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 11 p. :
    Number of Pages11
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17555124M

      These results suggest that mid-Holocene Arctic sea ice loss may have had a stronger influence on wintertime tropospheric westerlies and weather activities than the direct insolation forcing Cited by: 3. Using atmospheric simulations forced by observed SST and sea-ice concentrations (SIC) from three models participating in the Climate of the Twentieth Century Plus (C20C+) Project, results show that oceanic boundary conditions drive a substantial fraction of inter-annual variability in global average temperature extreme indices, as well as, to a Cited by: 5.

    The five principal forces acting on sea ice are described below, in order of their general importance. Wind. Wind is the primary force responsible for ice motion, particularly at the timescale of days or weeks. The wind blowing on the top surface of the sea ice results in a drag force on the ice surface and causes the ice . Development and Validation of an Ice Prediction Model for Wind Farms | VI Using this classification, the performance of the GLJM model is compared to the WRF model for four criteria: critical success index, bias, probability of detection and false alarm Size: 3MB.

      Potential impact of sea-ice initialization on the interannual climate predictability over the Weddell Sea is investigated using a coupled general circulation model. Climate variability in the Cited by: 1. Arctic Ocean sea-ice extent (SIE) is often overestimated whereas sea surface temperature (SST) in ice-covered regions is often underestimated. Although these likely point to systematic deficiencies or bias in the model set-up or forcing fields, we also conclude that assimilation of sea-ice observations is necessary to improve the forecast of Arctic.


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Comparison of sea ice model results using three different wind forcing fields by W. B. Tucker Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Tucker, W.B. Comparison of sea ice model results using three different wind forcing fields. [Hanover, N.H.]: US Army Corps of Engineers, Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory, [].

In general, the sea ice is more open and thicker in the seasonal ice zone of the two polar regions for the interactive coupled case than for the mean forcing. We have also run the model forced with daily atmospheric data and the simulated sea ice distribution differs significantly from both the interactive model and the monthly averaged forcing by:   The land surface model has four soil levels and the sea ice model has three levels.

Satellite observations were used in radiance form and were bias corrected. The sea ice model is from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Sea Ice Simulator.

It has three vertical layers, including two equal layers of sea ice and one layer of by:   While temperature-based sea ice reconstruction therefore can only account for part of the sea ice variability, they can provide some measure of the uncertainty for our derived ETCW sea ice volume trend due to differences in trends in the forcing by: 3.

used to evaluate the performance of three of the more generally utilized sea ice rheology formulations. Results show that sea ice velocity is reproduced with relatively high accuracy (90% coherence, >80% normalized cross correlation) in models having high-quality atmospheric forcing fields (e.g., the European CentreCited by:   [1] Basin‐scale sea ice models are often run uncoupled to either an atmosphere or ocean model to evaluate the sea ice model, to compare different models, and to test changes in physical parameterizations.

Such simulations require that the boundary forcing be specified. The specification of atmospheric forcing associated with the surface heat and freshwater fluxes has been done in various sea Cited by: model to evaluate the sea ice model, to compare different models, and to test changes in physical parameterizations.

Such simulations require that the boundary forcing be specified. The specification of atmospheric forcing associated with the surface heat and freshwater fluxes has been done in various sea ice simulations using climatology.

From the perspective of sea ice dynamics, the compact ice and weak wind forcing during the summer of resulted in smaller ice drift speed and deformation rate relative to the summer of In comparison withthe sea ice in summer was closer to free drift, which resulted in higher spatial homogeneity of the ice deformation field and a lower spatial scaling : Ruibo Lei, Dawei Gui, Dawei Gui, Petra Heil, Petra Heil, Jennifer K.

Hutchings, Minghu Ding. A global sea ice–ocean model is used to examine the impact of wind intensification on Antarctic sea ice volume. Based on the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis data, there are increases in surface wind speed (%yr21) andconvergence(%yr21)overtheice-coveredareasoftheSouthernOceanduringtheperiod– The rising costs of climate change merit serious evaluation of potential climate restoration solutions.

The highest rate of change in climate is observed in the Arctic where the summer ice is diminishing at an accelerated rate. The loss of Arctic sea ice increases radiative forcing Cited by: 2. RESEARCH ARTICLE /JC Wind-driven ocean dynamics impact on the contrasting sea-ice trends around West Antarctica Sang-Ki Lee1, Denis L.

Volkov1,2, Hosmay Lopez1,2, Woo Geun Cheon3, Arnold L. Gordon4, Yanyun Liu1,2, and Rik Wanninkhof1 1Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA, Miami, Florida, USA, 2Cooperative Institute for Marine and.

Surface wind fields (10 m) at 3-hourly temporal resolution and sea-ice fields at monthly frequency, taken from eight CMIP5 GCMs, were used to drive a global WAVEWATCH III (WW3) 36 wave model.

The results of model experiments using a 1-D thermodynamic sea ice model in the CFSR demonstrated a recommended value of snow thermal conductivity ( W m−1 K−1), and suggested that the sea ice growth was effectively restricted by the recent increase in snow depth on thin ice during by:   Here, the impact of wind intensification on Antarctic sea ice volume is investigated using a numerical model driven by the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis forcing with generally increasing SWS and SWC.

As mentioned, the increasing rates of SWS and SWC derived from the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis may differ with other atmospheric reanalysis data or observations (Yuan ).Cited by:   The global ocean–sea ice model is the ocean–sea ice component of the GFDL CM coupled model (Delworth et al.

) with × eddy permitting quasi-isotropic horizontal grid cells that vary in size from 28 km at the equator to 14 km at 60° the Arctic the grid splits into two geographically displaced north poles giving, for example, approximately 5-km horizontal resolution at Cited by:   While the Northern Hemisphere sea-ice has uniformly declined over the past several decades, the observed sea-ice in the Southern Hemisphere has exhibited regions of increase and decrease.

Here we Cited by: The second forcing event from 15–19 August showed significant wave heights over 3 m from the east‐southeast (Figure 6b) with the surface wind speed at the ice edge from off‐ice and moderate.

The wave conditions at the same time were mostly from the east‐southeast but the surface wind Cited by: 1. Introduction. Sea ice covers and interacts with a vast, seasonally-variable area of the world's oceans, from about 3 × 10 6 km 2 in summer to 20 × 10 6 km 2 in winter around Antarctica (Parkinson and Cavalieri, ).By so doing, the sea ice and its accumulated snow cover greatly modify high-latitude atmosphere-ocean interactions to play crucially important roles in the global climate Cited by: 6.

Antarctic sea ice extent declined dramatically in austral spring This study shows the decline was initially driven by tropical convection resulting in a wave-3 circulation pattern, followed Cited by:   We use a state of the art sea ice climate model, the Los Alamos sea ice model (CICE), with the EAP and EVP rheologies on an idealized domain, documented in §2a,b.

We use idealized wind forcing in order to impose stress states within the sea ice Cited by: 6. Based on a statistical analysis incorporating hPa wind fields from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalyses, it is shown that the combined effect of winter and summer wind forcing accounts for 50% of the variance of the change in September Arctic sea ice extent from one year to the next (ΔSIE) and it also explains roughly 1/3 of the.uncertainties in surface forcing for ice-ocean models.

Goal: Understand two dynamically distinctive processes, acting on different spatial scales, determining surface wind variations over the Arctic sea ice.

Method: Use a skillful Polar WRF model applied to the Pan-Arctic domain forced with three different satellite sea ice.Main goal. is the implementation of ocean waves model SWAN with different high-resolution wind forcing from regional mesoscale atmospheric models for more detailed reproducing of waves.